Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture is only one branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine there are other specific techniques that can be used as either stand-alone treatments or incorporated in to a patient’s treatment plan where appropriate, and should you wish to try them.

 

 

MOXABUSTION

This is a treatment which uses a therapeutic herb called Mugwort. The herb is dried out (Moxa) and then set alight.  The heat and smoke it produces is used to warm and stimulate acupuncture points.  Most patients report this as a very pleasant and beneficial experience.  Smokeless Moxa can be used if some patients dislike the smell.

 

 

 

CUPPING

This is an ancient method of stimulating Acupuncture points by applying suction through glass or plastic cups, in which a vacuum has been created.  It has been made famous by some Hollywood celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie.

The technique produces blood congestion at the site, and therefore stimulates it.  This is very effective at easing tight muscles and moving stagnant fluids.  Some bruising may occur at the time of treatment, but this should disappear after a couple of days.

 

 

DIETARY ADVICE

The food and supplements we consume play an important role in our health and wellbeing, and are not simply about weight control.    “Let food be thy medicine and medicine by thy food” – Hippocrates.

Dietary recommendations can be provided by your practitioner, to inform you of what foods to encourage and which to reduce, or avoid, according to your condition, and based on the principles of Chinese Medicine.

 

 

 

AURICULAR ACUPUNCTURE

This style of acupuncture involves either the insertion of small, single-use, sterile needles into points on the ear, or the application of ear seeds, which can be worn and stimulated outside of the clinic. Auricular acupuncture is particularly effective at helping with withdrawal symptoms from cessation of smoking, alcohol and other drugs, as well as for weight loss, depression and insomnia.

 

 

 

 

Qi GONG EXERCISES

 

The words Qi Gong literally translate to mean "Life Energy Cultivation.  It is a holistic practice of coordinated body postures and movement exercises, breathing, and meditation.

Qi Gong has its roots in Traditional Chinese Medicine, ancient Chinese philosophy and martial arts.

Qigong practice involves moving meditation exercises, coordinating slow flowing movements and deep rhythmic breathing, this produces a calm meditative state of mind.

Qigong is now practiced worldwide for recreation, exercise and relaxation, as well as training for martial arts.

At Cinnabar Fields we may offer to teach you some gentle movements that you can practice yourself at home in order to enhance the benefits to your treatments and your general wellbeing.

 

 

 

 

TRIGGER POINT MASSAGE

 

A trigger point is a tight area within muscle tissue that causes pain not only at the site of the problem, but referred pain in other parts of the body. The pain may be experienced as sharp and intense or a dull ache.  Trigger points can also cause tingling, numbness, shooting sensations and various other discomforts.

Trigger point massage alleviates the source of the pain through cycles of isolated pressure and release. This relaxes and breaks down the constricted muscle fibres so that they may repair properly.  In this type of massage the patient actively participates through deep breathing as well as identifying the exact location and intensity of the discomfort.

 

 

 

 

TUI NA MASSAGE

 

Tui Na is a form of massage and acupressure using the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

During this hands-on body treatment the practitioner may use brushing, kneading, rolling, pressing, and rubbing techniques, either lightly or firmly.

The name comes from two of the actions: tui means "to push" and na means "to lift and squeeze."

 

 

 

GUA SHA

 

Sometimes called ‘coining, spooning or scraping’, Gua sha is a Traditional Chinese treatment in which the skin is pressed, stroked and scraped with a rounded instrument. The repeated pressured strokes used in this form of massage will intentionally produce ‘transitory petechiae’ or light bruising.  This removes fluid, blood and energy stagnation which is thought to be the cause of pain.

 

 

 

 

 

Cinnabar Fields

Clinic of Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

37 Rodney Road, Cheltenham

Gloucestershire, GL50 1HX

 

Tel: 07875 532619

Email: enquiries@cinnabar-fields.co.uk